How To Check Your Coolant Level

The fluids in your car are essential for ensuring your engine is running smoothly. And one of the most important fluids you can monitor is your coolant. Checking your coolant level is something anyone can do, and it can protect you from unexpected breakdowns.

Every car is different, but your coolant tank will typically present itself in the form of a small, clear bottle that is mounted to one side of the engine bay. Consult your owner’s manual for the specific location of your car’s coolant tank.

Reading your coolant level

Check Coolant Level

The outside of your coolant tank should have marking indicating the recommended level of coolant for proper function of your car. If your car’s coolant levels are near or below min, it may be wise for you to add more coolant.

Do not remove the spring cap of the radiator to check the coolant levels. Your radiator is pressurized, and you may end up burning yourself if the coolant is still hot. Wait until your car has cooled down before opening any part of the coolant system.

Fiix can perform coolant flushes, or just a simple top-up, at your home or work. Book online, or call us at 647-361-4449 today!

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